October Awareness Stats & Info

“Breast Cancer Statistics”

  • About 1 in 8 women in the United States (between 12 and 13%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.
  • In 2010, an estimated 207,090 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 54,010 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
  • About 1,970 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in men in 2010. Less than 1% of all new breast cancer cases occur in men.
  • From 1999 to 2006, breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. decreased by about 2% per year. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.
  • About 39,840 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2010 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1991. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.
  • For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.
  • Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among U.S. women. More than 1 in 4 cancers in women (about 28%) are breast cancer.
  • Compared to African American women, white women are slightly more likely to develop breast cancer, but less likely to die of it. One possible reason is that African American women tend to have more aggressive tumors, although why this is the case is not known. Women of other ethnic backgrounds — Asian, Hispanic, and Native American — have a lower risk of developing and dying from breast cancer than white women and African American women.
  • In 2010, there are more than 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S.
  • A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. About 20-30% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have a family history of breast cancer.
  • About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common. Women with these mutations have up to an 80% risk of developing breast cancer during their lifetime, and they are more likely to be diagnosed at a younger age (before menopause). An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, about 1 in 10 breast cancers are believed to be due to BRCA2 mutations and even fewer cases to BRCA1 mutations.
  • About 70-80% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic abnormalities that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.
  • The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).
  • SOURCE

    “Domestic Violence Statistics”

  • One in four women (25%) has experienced domestic violence in her lifetime.
  • In a national survey of American families, 50% of the men who frequently assaulted their wives also frequently abused their children.
  • Studies suggest that between 3.3 – 10 million children witness some form of domestic violence annually.
  • Between 600,000 and 6 million women are victims of domestic violence each year, and between 100,000 and 6 million men, depending on the type of survey used to obtain the data.
  • Nearly three out of four (74%) of Americans personally know someone who is or has been a victim of domestic violence.
  • On average, more than three women and one man are murdered by their intimate partners in this country every day.
  • The health-related costs of intimate partner violence exceed $5.8 billion each year. Of that amount, nearly $4.1 billion are for direct medical and mental health care services, and nearly $1.8 billion are for the indirect costs of lost productivity or wages.
  • Approximately one in five female high school students reports being physically and/or sexually abused by a dating partner.
  • Date rape accounts for almost 70% of sexual assaults reported by adolescent and college age women; 38% of those women are between 14 and 17 years old.
  • Annually in the United States, 503,485 women are stalked by an intimate partner.
  • SOURCE


    “National Let’s Talk Month”

    Every October is National Let’s Talk Month! Let’s Talk Month is a national public education campaign celebrated in October and coordinated by Advocates for Youth. Let’s Talk Month is an opportunity for community agencies, religious institutions, businesses, schools, media, parent groups and health providers to plan programs and activities which encourage parent/child communication about sexuality.

    QUICK FACTS

    • Parents are the best sexuality educators for their children.
    • Parents want to be good sex educators, but may not always understand how to do the job well.
    • Children want sex education from their parents or legal guardians.
    • You can be an “askable” parent, a caring parent, and a wise counselor.

    What YOU CAN DO!

    • Listen more than talk.
    • Focus on behaviors, not persons.
    • Negotiate and compromise, or at least consider other views.
    • Encourage an open exchange of ideas.
    • Foster the young person’s decision-making ability.
    • Encourage and receive questions.
    • Admit ignorance when appropriate and find the answer.
    • Share values and beliefs.
    • Explore feelings.
    • Show agreement and support often.
    • Keep a sense of humor.
    • Be clear about expectations and listen, listen, listen!

    TALK WITH YOUR KIDS!! BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T SOMEONE WILL!

    SOURCE/MORE RESOURCES

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    About Queen Unique

    Involved Parent/PTA Member Connoisseur of SOUL Music Lover of ALL things BLACK Poet/Spoken Word Artist Nostalgic Hip Hop head Graphic Artist/Painter Online Radio Hostess Motivational Speaker Habitual Hair Braider Freelance Journalist Random Twitter-er Selective Blogger Published Author Youth Volunteer Choosey Lover Autism Activist Visual Artist Bookworm See full bio at: www.QueenUnique.com
    This entry was posted in Advocacy, Advocating for Kids, All Things Parenting, Education, For OUR Daughters, Girl Power, Love You Some You, Teach the babies, Things I Love and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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